Home Office body takes evidence on ethics of police use of facial recognition

Written by Sam Trendall on 4 March 2020 in News
News

Department’s Biometrics and Forensics Ethics Group seeks input from various parties

Credit: Pixabay

An arm’s-length body of the Home Office is to gather evidence on the ethics of police forces working with private companies on the use of live facial recognition (LFR) technology.

The department’s Biometrics and Forensics Ethics Group is seeking input on the topic from manufacturers, as well as past, current and potential users of the technology across both the public and commercial sector. This may include “councils, landowners, and police or security forces”.


Related content


The BFEG has already undertaken an evidence-gathering exercise with civil liberties groups and regulators, and now wishes to canvass opinion from users and tech firms at an event to be held in central London on 30 April.

Attendees will be asked submit either written or oral evidence. Applications to attend or otherwise contribute are open until 17 April. Anyone wishing to do so is invited to email BFEG.

The use of LFR has been in focus recently after London’s Metropolitan Police Service announced that the technology would be put into live operational use at various locations around the city. The rollout in the capital follows a number of trials of facial recognition in various parts of the country, and a high-court ruling that found that an earlier use by South Wales Police had been lawful.

However, a committee of the Scottish Parliament reported last month that LFR is “currently not fit for use” by officers north of the border.

 

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

Share this page

Tags

Categories

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM READERS

Please login to post a comment or register for a free account.

Related Articles

The coronavirus ‘infodemic’: truth and conspiracy online
15 September 2020

The spread of online misinformation during the Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated a public health crisis. PublicTechnology digs into a recent parliamentary inquiry to find out...

Personal data of all Welsh coronavirus cases compromised in breach
15 September 2020

Public Health Wales says leak that affected more than 18,000 people to have tested positive was attributable to ‘human error’

Policymakers must start asking difficult questions on the ethics of AI in healthcare
9 September 2020

Government needs to begin working with citizens and industry to address the risks created by the use of new technology, according to Jessica Morley and Luciano Floridi of the Oxford Internet...