Scotland expands funding for trainee STEM teachers

Written by Liam Kirkaldy on 19 March 2020 in News
News

Number of bursaries expanded by 50%

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Scottish STEM bursaries will be expanded in an attempt to encourage more people to train as secondary school teachers in science and technology subjects.

The scheme, expanded from 100 to 150 places, allows career changers to apply for a £20,000 bursary to support them while training to fill high-demand teaching roles in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

This year’s bursary scheme opened for applications on Monday 16 March for postgraduate teacher training courses beginning in August 2020, while its budget will increase from £2m to £3m.


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Scottish deputy first minister John Swinney said: “Developing STEM skills is vital for our future economy, and having great STEM teachers who are enthusiastic about their subjects will inspire the next generation of the Scottish workforce. The success of the 2019-20 scheme demonstrates that teaching is recognised as an attractive profession, and we want to continue to make it more accessible to those considering a career change to become teachers.”

He added: “These bursaries continue to provide financial help, making it easier for enthusiastic career changers to take that step into a rewarding and exciting new career, sharing their passion and expertise with young people.”

Paul McGuiness, Skills Development Scotland’s national training programmes performance and operations manager, said: “Our learning system is focused on ensuring all people in Scotland have the skills, information and opportunities to succeed in an increasingly global economy which is constantly evolving.

“STEM skills are central to achieving this, and the STEM bursary plays an important role in attracting the right calibre of people into the classroom to help our young people fulfil their potential.”

 

About the author

Liam Kirkaldy is Liam Kirkaldy is online editor at PublicTechnology sister publication Holyrood, where this story first appeared. He tweets as @HolyroodLiam.

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