G-Cloud introduces more stringent cybersecurity requirements for suppliers

Written by Sam Trendall on 1 April 2019 in News
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Among the changes introduced for the eleventh iteration of the framework is a commitment for suppliers to use ‘the most up-to-date antivirus’ technology

Credit: Blue Coat Photos/CC BY-SA 2.0

The new G-Cloud framework agreement will place additional cybersecurity requirements on suppliers, including mandation to employ the newest versions of security technology and policies.

Potential bidders have been issued with a document outlining the key changes between G-Cloud 10 and 11. One of the most significant alterations is an update to the warranties suppliers will be required to offer in regards to anti-virus and anti-malware technology. The previous version of G-Cloud simply required providers to take “all reasonable endeavours to prevent viruses and malware”.

The new iteration imposes more stringent and specific rules, outlining that firms on G-Cloud 11 will be expected to ensure their offerings are protected by the newest software available.


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The updated terms state: “[The supplier must have] has used and will continue to use all reasonable endeavours, software and the most up to date antivirus definitions available from an industry accepted antivirus software seller to minimise the impact of malicious software.”

Elsewhere, the updated terms require that suppliers permit access to relevant “records, documents, and account information” to a wider range of entities. In addition to the Crown Commercial Service, the National Audit Office, and buyers of G-Cloud services, on the new contract, firms will, if required, be compelled, to share information with the Auditor General, the Cabinet Office, and the Treasury.

G-Cloud 11 will also introduce additional requirements regarding suppliers’ commitments to corporate social responsibility. This will include a guarantee to “advance equality of opportunity and good relations between those with a protected characteristic”. 

All firms to win a spot on the framework will also be required to submit to CCS an annual report outlining actions taken to ensure their supply chains are free of slavery and human trafficking.

G-Cloud 11 opened for bidding a week ago. Suppliers have until 5pm on 15 May to apply for a spot on the framework.

 

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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