DVLA sets target for abandoning legacy systems

Written by Colin Marrs on 28 June 2017 in News
News

The DVLA has announced  plans to move off the majority of its legacy systems within three years.

In its 2017-20 IT strategy, the agency said it would complete the transition via an “incremental peel off”, rather than a big bang migration.

The process will drive efficiencies and help DVLA meet its target of meeting a 40% reduction in ICT spending between 2017/18 and 2019/20.

Dave Perry, DVLA chief technology officer, said: “Our aim is to become a hub for digital motoring.

“We are transforming our IT estate to deliver our digital transformation ambitions and create the best online services for customers.”

He said that the organisation’s design would be “optimised” to deliver migration from legacy IT platforms.

Currently, the DVLA spends more than three quarters of  its ICT budget on “keeping the lights on”.

As a result, the strategy outlines an intention to reduce costs for managing its systems.

On-premises infrastructure capability will be aligned with cloud environments, with infrastructure virtualised and defined programmatically.

The agency is also planning to redesign its operating model and create a new organisational structure.

“Our focus will be on acquiring talent and re-skilling our current workforce where viable, to move into newly shaped roles needed to deliver our strategic plan and to realise new opportunities,” the strategy said.

Tags

Share this page

Tags

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM READERS

Please login to post a comment or register for a free account.

Comments

Romy Hughes (not verified)

Submitted on 5 July, 2017 - 10:01
Moving to the cloud to reduce costs is the right strategy, but the DVLA must consider the implications of such a major change on its people and workflows. According to McKinsey, 70% of large-scale IT transformation projects like this fail because they do not implement business change alongside the IT change. Or to put it another way, if you are going to drastically change the way people work, you need their support. You must get them on-side from the beginning so they can shape the change for the better, otherwise you risk the alienation of staff and a new system which no one wants or uses. The DVLA has the right strategy, but it must have a robust change management strategy to ensure its success.

Related Articles

Ofcom to probe dominance of big three public-cloud players
26 September 2022

Communications regulator will examine whether the current market conditions stymie innovation and opportunities for smaller players

DWP signs £170k deal for Microsoft Teams training
13 September 2022

Contract with specialist firm covers programmes on ‘managing information’ and ‘running large meetings’

Users question accuracy of HMCTS Common Platform court system
5 September 2022

PCS union plans strikes over new case management system but courts service says ‘no evidence’ that it is compromising justice 

FCDO digitises process for validating official documents
5 September 2022

More than 100 countries should accept PDF-based ‘e-Apostille’ legalised documents, but department tells applicants to check first

Related Sponsored Articles

Keeping tabs on work-issued mobile activity with Antenna
7 September 2022

How can public sector organisations keep track of calls, texts and instant messages in the world of ultra-flexi, hybrid working? Stuart Williams, CTO at FourNet, and Andrew Bale, EVP at Tango...

Rewiring government: improving outcome management
6 September 2022

Paul Pick-Aluas, Strategy & Transformation, Public Sector at Salesforce, explains how governments can use technology innovation to improve how it can analyse outcomes