Procuring cloud backup via G Cloud: A case study of Essex County Fire & Rescue Service

Written on 1 June 2015 in Sponsored Article
Sponsored Article

How Essex County Fire & Rescue Service procured cloud backup via G Cloud

Essex County Fire & Rescue Service (ECFRS) is one of the largest county fire services in the UK, protecting a population of more than 1.74 million. 

After its existing backup solution became too difficult to manage, ECFRS chose iomart’s backup specialist company Backup Technology via the UK Government’s Digital Marketplace for G-Cloud services, to provide an improved managed service.

Jan Swanwick, head of ICT for Essex County Fire & Rescue Service, explained: “Traditionally procurement has been a long, protracted process. With G-Cloud it is very straightforward because all the supplier and product information has already been collated and validated.”       

iomart now protects more than 22TB of data for ECFRS using a Public Cloud Backup solution from Asigra. 

For the full case study, click here

 

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