Online training helps council save £100,000

Written by Colin Marrs on 20 July 2015 in News
News

One of Scotland’s smallest local authorities saved almost £100,000 last year by introducing online training for staff, according to new figures.

Moray Council previously delivered training in-house in classroom conditions, occupying half a day of staff’s time and requiring a senior officer being on hand to deliver.

However, the local authority has turned to a cloud-based system called ‘Clive’ to deliver modules as legislation is updated or new skills are required.

Employees can now access training remotely on subjects spanning equalities and data protection legislation through to specific tasks such as complaints handling at any time.

A council spokesman said: “The council’s employee development team are continuously developing staff skills to improve performance for the public.

“Training programmes are developed to meet the needs of services and our wider corporate objectives.

“Clive has so far reduced the council’s training bill by £95,000 a year in staff time.”

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