Nine in ten businesses and charities have done nothing to prepare for GDPR, government research finds

Written by Sam Trendall on 24 January 2018 in News
News

DCMS study finds majority of organisations in private and third sectors have never even heard of soon-to-be-implemented legislation

Credit: Santiago Silver/Adobe Stock

Government research has found that the majority of charities and businesses have never heard of the EU General Data Protection Regulation, and far fewer still have done any work to prepare for the incoming legislation.

Figures published by the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport reveal that just 38% of companies and 44% of charities in the UK are currently aware of GDPR. Of those that have heard of the legislation, 27% of businesses and 26% of charities have made any changes to their operations in response to the new laws. 

This means that, in both cases, about nine in ten organisations are yet to do any preparation for GDPR, just four months ahead of its implementation data of 25 May.

The study, for which DCMS commissioned research firm Ipsos MORI and the Institute for Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Portsmouth, showed that awareness levels increase markedly in line with the size of an organisation.


Related content


Among ‘micro’ organisations with between two and nine staff, 31% of businesses and 37% of charities were aware of GDPR. These percentages rose to 49% and 47%, respectively, for entities with 10-49 employees. Some 66% of companies with between 50 and 249 workers had heard of GDPR, while the figure for charities of this size was 53%. In organisations with 250-plus people, awareness was much more common, with 80% of firms and 75% of charities having heard of GDPR.

Within the minority of organisations who have made any operational changes ahead of GDPR, 36% of respondents in both the charity and business space have changed or added to their cybersecurity policies or practices. A total of 21% of companies and 10% of charities who have done some preparatory work have delivered extra communications or training to employees.

This research – which will feed into the DCMS’s Cyber Security Breaches Survey report, due to be published in April – was conducted between October and December of last year. A total of 1,519 business and 569 charities took part.

 

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

Share this page

Tags

Categories

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM READERS

Please login to post a comment or register for a free account.

Related Articles

ICO report finds ‘disturbing disregard for voters’ privacy’ in political campaigns
8 November 2018

After an 18-month investigation into use of personal data, information commissioner presents report to parliament

Home secretary backs development of anti-online grooming tool
14 November 2018

Sajid Javid and Microsoft host hackathon to create program that will be rolled out to tech firms for free

Full-fibre primary schools and the Mancunian skills gap – 10 tech announcements you may have missed in the Budget
31 October 2018

Although big-ticket technology announcements were largely absent from the chancellor’s speech, the Budget contained a number of initiatives and investments in digital and data

Related Sponsored Articles

Balancing security and digital transformation
26 October 2018

With the annual worldwide cost of cybercrime set to double from $3tn in 2015 to $6tn by 2021, BT offers advice on how chief information security officers can better protect their...