Home secretary tells web giants ‘enough is enough’ on extremist content

Written by Sam Trendall on 18 March 2019 in News
News

Sajid Javid criticises YouTube, Google, Facebook, and Twitter

Credit: PA

Home secretary Sajid Javid has told the world’s biggest websites that “enough is enough” and that it is time they “take some ownership” of the problem of extremist content poster by their users.

In a tweet, Javid (pictured above) told YouTube, Google, Facebook, and Twitter that “you really need to do more to stop violent extremism being promoted on your platforms”.

In an article for the Express, Javid added, in light of the “absolutely repellent” live-streaming of last week’s terrorist attack in New Zealand, web companies need to do more to stop hate and extremism being hosted on their sites.

“Online platforms have a responsibility not to do the terrorists’ work for them,” he said. “This terrorist filmed his shooting with the intention of spreading his ideology. Tech companies must do more to stop his messages being broadcast on their platforms. Allowing terrorists to glorify in the bloodshed or spread more extremist views can only lead to more radicalisation and murders.”

The home secretary said that upcoming legislation will target websites that fail to deal with terror content.

“This is the type of illegal behaviour that our new Online Harms white paper will address,” Javid said. “Tech companies who don’t clean up their platforms should be prepared to face the force of the law.”
 

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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