Home Office picks supplier for £2m Border Force app

Written by Sam Trendall on 6 September 2017 in News
News

London-based consultancy Zaizi bags two-year deal

The application is intended to allow officers to do their work more efficiently

The government has awarded software consultancy Zaizi a £2.2m contract to develop a specialist application for use by the UK Border Force.

The Home Office has revealed that the London-based firm has won the two-year deal to create the application, using open-source technology. The aim is to allow Border Force workers “at ports and other locations” to perform their duties more effectively.

“The open source-based application will present information from multiple sources and use workflows to improve officers’ operational efficiency,” said the Home Office.

The contract, which came into effect on 29 August, was awarded through the Digital Outcomes and Specialists 2 framework.

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Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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