Home Office floats £140k for leader to ensure government tech is Brexit-ready

Written by Sam Trendall on 9 May 2019 in News
News

Role as director of immigration technology comes with responsibility for 1,000 staff and a £120m budget

Credit: Kirsty O'Connor/PA Archive/PA Images

The government is seeking a senior manager to “lead on the design and delivery of the digital, data and technology required to respond to the UK’s decision to leave the EU”.

The role as director of immigration technology is housed within the Home Office and comes with a salary of between £120,000 and £140,000. The postholder will assume overall responsibility for the management of about 1,000 staff and an annual budget that, as of 2019/20 year, stands at £120m.

The overarching remit of the role is to lead “the next phase of digital transformation across the immigration technology portfolio”, the Home Office said. This will involve working to ensure that the use of tech and data “realises its mandate to help our client organisations to transform their ways of working through impactful, thoughtful, user-centred technology solutions that deliver both service excellence and value for money from investment”.


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The Home Office added that the successful candidate will also be expected to work across the department’s DDaT function – and that of the wider civil service.

“In addition to your remit, you’ll be a visible and active member of DDaT’s senior leadership team, contributing to the evolution of the DDaT directorate and ensuring that we are recognised for being a future focused, enabling function,” it said. “You’ll also help us to build an industry leading profession, attracting, developing and motivating exceptional people who are invested in our work, championing civil service leadership values and taking on specific responsibilities relating to equality and diversity along with other corporate objectives.”

Applications for the role are open until 31 May. Exercises to draw a longlist and undertake preliminary interviews will commence on 10 June, with a shortlist to be drawn up by 26 June. Assessments and “fireside chats” will follow in the three weeks thereafter, with final panel interviews scheduled for 22 July.

 

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Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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