HMRC hubs to be ‘most digitally advanced buildings in government’

Written by Sam Trendall on 9 July 2019 in News
News

Department signs ‘digital charter’ with 15 companies

HM Revenue and Customs' new building in Glasgow   Credit: HMRC

The relocation of HM Revenue and Customs into 13 hubs around the country will see the department move into what it claims are “some of the most digitally advanced buildings in government”.

HMRC’s Estates directorate, which is overseeing the ongoing development and population of the new locations, has signed a “digital charter” with 15 companies involved in the construction and ongoing maintenance of the buildings. 

The signatories are: Atalian Servest; Aecom; Styles & Wood; Bellrock; BW; Interserve; White Young Green; ISG; Overbury; Faithful & Gould; Sodexo; Mace; Wates; Turner & Townsend; and BAM.

By signing the charter, the firms in question have agreed to focus on “maximising the use of data and implementing the latest digital technology, including smart technology where systems interact with each other,” according to HMRC.

The charter forms part of the HMRC’s Estates Digital Blueprint, which is designed to help ensure that staff make use of the latest technology, including mobile apps. The blueprint “will also deliver data and insight to support the right decisions being made at the right time during construction and operations” of the new hubs. This process will involve data – such as the comparative use of various areas in its existing locations – being used to inform “architectural and design decisions” during the construction of the hubs.

Frazer Smith, HMRC estates director, said: “Our Locations Programme is introducing a new generation of buildings across the UK. We are moving to modern, collaborative and highly efficient buildings, which will provide us and our supply chain with the data and insights we need so we can offer an excellent experience to people who work in and visit our buildings. We are always looking to deliver the best buildings in government, and a digital-first approach is key to achieving this ambition.”

The move into 13 regional hubs is intended to deliver savings of £300m by 2025. The new offices will be located in Belfast, Cardiff, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Newcastle upon Tyne, Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Nottingham, Birmingham, Bristol, and two in London – in Stratford and Croydon.

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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