Government puts £80m into quantum technology

Written by Sam Trendall on 11 September 2018 in News
News

Chancellor takes quantum leap with investment in four projects

The government is putting £80m into four projects to develop quantum technology.

The cash, which will be invested over a period of five years, will be used to support universities with existing research and development programmes in various areas.

The first of these is the University of Strathclyde, which is working with the University of Glasgow and other partner organisations to develop quantum imaging. The technology is being designed to provide live imagery that could, the government said, “see through snow storms, around corners and map hidden underground hazards”, and could ultimately be used in situations such as search-and-rescue missions or hostage recovery.


Related content


The University of Oxford will also receive government money to support its work in the field of quantum computing and simulation. The institution is aiming to use quantum technology to “trivially solve complex problems which currently stump our most advanced supercomputers”.

The University of Birmingham, meanwhile, will receive funding for its research into how quantum sensing and metrology could help improve mining. Government backing will also be given to work taking place at the University of York to develop quantum communications for use in financial transactions and data transfers.

Chancellor Philip Hammond said: “The UK is a world leader in quantum technologies, but others are investing hard to catch up with us. The £80m in new funding… will ensure that we remain at the forefront of this exciting technological revolution. Technological leadership boosts our economy and our productivity, meaning higher growth and higher wages.”

Quantum technology aims to take some of the principles of quantum mechanics – the branch of physics concerned with atomic and sub-atomic particles – and apply them to areas such as computing and encryption.

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

Share this page

Tags

Categories

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM READERS

Please login to post a comment or register for a free account.

Related Articles

Almost 700 DWP employees take voluntary redundancy but minister says hybrid work is enabling ‘retention of skills’
18 January 2023

More than 8,000 staff affected by office closures have been offered more flexible working options

Whitehall digitisation hampered by 30 years of ‘over-optimism’
14 December 2022

NAO chief Gareth Davies says that government needs to invest in tech to achieve efficiencies

Number of virtual wards tops 100 as government aims to treat 50,000 patients a month at home
30 January 2023

A new plan to ease pressures on emergency care aims to ramp up the use of technology that can enable patients to be treated at home

Consultancy signed to £6.5m deal to advise on eight-department shared-services plan
27 January 2023

The Matrix programme – which includes Treasury, Cabinet Office and DHSC – begins engaging with potential suppliers