Government to implement £70m satellite tracking system for immigration offenders

Written by Sam Trendall on 14 June 2018 in News
News

Home Office seeks software and hardware platform for monitoring those being prosecuted for immigration offences

Credit: Arne Dedert/DPA/PA Images

The government is to spend up to £70m implementing satellite tracking technology to monitor the whereabouts of people prosecuted for immigration offences.

The tracking devices will be worn by people suspected of being in the country illegally, those charged with people-smuggling offences, and anyone else being prosecuted for contravening immigration laws. These people are often restricted by curfews and inclusion or exclusion zones imposed by authorities.

According to a newly issued contract notice from the Home Office, the government is looking for a technology system that will enable it “to use satellite tracking proportionately by matching the type and degree of monitoring to the risk posed by each foreign-national offender”.  This will entail the deployment of devices designed to be worn and monitored around the clock, as well as “less intrusive devices for lower-harm cases”. 


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Alongside these will be a software platform through which officials can track the track the devices. This technology will need to deliver alerts when a device needs to be changed, or when a wearer attempts to remove or tamper with their device, the government said. The software must also incorporate an automated response to these alerts.

The supplier of the hardware and software must also provide a nationwide “induction and fitting service”, including the replacement or removal of devices, as and when required. The chosen bidder will also be expected to provide “a field service that can respond to alerts”. Regular reports that can be easily accessed by officials via a self-service portal must also be provided.

The government expects to spend between £50m and £70m on a contract on that will last for an initial period of three years, with an option to extend by up to a further 24 months.

Potential bidders have until 11 July to register their interest, after which the government expects to ask five firms to bid. A contract is scheduled to be awarded on 1 October.

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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