Food Standards Agency to connect 220 UK abattoirs

Written by Sam Trendall on 26 September 2017 in News
News

Government agency to roll out networking across slaughterhouses

The Food Standards Agency has signed a deal to implement networking technology to connect 220 abattoirs around the country with its four offices across the UK. 

The deal will see cloud firm Exponential-e deploy ADSL and fibre technology to provide connectivity linking the slaughterhouses with the agency’s sites in Belfast, Cardiff, and York, and its London headquarters. The organisation, which is a non-ministerial central government department, claimed that the project will give its inspectors a swift, reliable, and secure means of submitting reports on food safety standards and meat quality. It added that the rollout forms part of a wider drive to adopt digital practices. 

Phillippa Tasselli, head of IT services at the Food Standards Agency, said: “It’s vital for us that we’re able to provide a secure communications platform to our team of inspectors who are on the coal face of food standards. A slow, jittery connection that is constantly dropping does not enable a good user experience; it’s just a time-consuming frustration." 

She added: “Working with Exponential-e, we’ve been able to put in place an architecture that will mean our inspectors can file important documentation in a timely manner that ensures the integrity of the food chain.”

 

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Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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