Cummings and Co to move into Cabinet Office hub with ‘real-time performance data’

Written by Beckie Smith on 17 August 2020 in News
News

A number of senior Downing Street figures are to be given space at the central department’s HQ at 70 Whitehall 

Credit: Sgconlaw/CC BY-SA 3.0

Dominic Cummings and other senior Downing Street figures are to move into the Cabinet Office headquarters next month in a new “collaboration hub” which will provide staff with “real-time performance data”.

Downing Street confirmed last night that Boris Johnson’s private office and political aides will take up residence at 70 Whitehall in September in moves that come as the Cabinet Office perm sec Alex Chisholm works on the government’s long-anticipated plan for civil service reform.

The moves may essentially create a de facto “Department for the Prime Minister” in the Cabinet Office, as the No.10 staffers will move into offices that currently house the Cabinet Office economic and domestic affairs secretariat, or EDS, which coordinates cross-Whitehall working on the government’s domestic policy agenda.

The new “collaboration hub” that will house the incoming Downing Street officials will be equipped with co-working desks and television screens displaying “real-time performance data”, The Times reported. And the adjoining door between 70 Whitehall to 10 Downing Street will be removed to symbolically link up the two buildings.


Related content


Cabinet Office officials have been told the move – part of reforms driven by Cummings – is intended to “drive culture change” in the civil service. It comes after Chisholm invited officials to set out their ideas about how to improve the civil service in the first steps of what he called a movement for reform.

Munira Mirza, director of the No.10 policy unit, will be among the other high-ranking staff to make the move.

In an email to Cabinet Office staff yesterday, seen by The Times, EDS director general Mark Sweeney said the move would ensure civil servants were as “efficient as possible in delivering the government’s agenda”.

“We want to make the join from policy idea through to making a difference on the ground as seamless, and as swift, as possible,” he said.

 

About the author

Beckie Smith is a reporter for PublicTechnology sister publication Civil Service World, where a version of this story first appeared. She tweets as @Beckie__Smith.

Share this page

Tags

Categories

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM READERS

Please login to post a comment or register for a free account.

Related Articles

PublicTechnology research: five things we learned about the future of digital government
22 April 2021

A recent study finds that the pandemic has boosted budgets – but legacy tech remains a big barrier to progress

Civil service chiefs vow ‘no return to normal’
25 March 2021

Memo from top brass preps officials for world in which government is more data-driven and less risk-averse

Better integration could save government £850k per service, minister claims
6 May 2021

Work to ensure tasks are not replicated across different tools could deliver significant financial benefits

Related Sponsored Articles

Optimising the Benefits of Hybrid IT
7 April 2021

SolarWinds explains how public sector organisations can make the most of their hybrid IT investments - delivering services that are both innovative and reliable 

Avoid Infrastructure Paralysis: Six benefits of moving legacy Oracle workloads to the cloud
6 April 2021

There are many reasons to keep your Oracle workloads running on local servers. But there are even more reasons to move them to the cloud as part of a wider digital transition strategy. Six Degrees...

Stopping Cyber Attacks in Higher Education
19 April 2021

Higher Education institutions are some of the most consistently targeted organisations for cyberattacks. CrowdStrike explores the importance of the right cybersecurity measures.