Courts service hunts for ‘upfront and honest’ delivery partner on digital reforms

Written by Rebecca Hill on 1 December 2016 in News
News

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunal Service is looking for a delivery partner for its £1bn digital overhaul of the UK’s justice system.

The courts service wants a delivery partner to help transform its use of technology - Photo credit: Pixabay

The reforms, which aim to make “a wholesale shift to access justice digitally”, will see an increased use of video-link technology, payment of fines online and plans to scrap paper forms for all courts and tribunals by 2019.

In a notice published on the government’s contracts finder, HMCTS, an executive agency of the Ministry of Justice, said it wanted to find a delivery partner to help transform its technology, skills and capabilities over an initial contract period of two years.


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The HMCTS said in the notice: “By centring all our energies on delivering a better customer experience and harnessing the power of technology to enable us to work better and smarter, we are going to build a modern system for administering justice which will benefit those who need it most, for generations to come.”

It said it was looking for a partner that has “tried and tested capacity and capability in delivering large-scale cultural and digital transformation programmes”.

The partner should also be able to work alongside the existing delivery team, and develop a successful, “upfront and honest” working relationship with the HMCTS team where challenges are “openly discussed, and solutions worked through collaboratively”.

HMCTS also said it wanted to ensure the partner was committed to the reform objectives that could offer “simple and clear commercial arrangements” and flexibility.

Among the skills and experience required of the delivery partner is “people change” –the government’s September report on the reforms stated that the full-scale rollout of the changes would need “adaptability and a willingness to embrace new technology” from legal professionals and judiciary.

The award will last two years, with a possible extension of up to one year and will be made in the first quarter of 2017. 

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