Border Force seeks head of digital passenger services

Written by Sam Trendall on 23 March 2018 in News
News

Role comes with pay packet of up to £87,000 and remit to oversee rollout of ePassport gates

Credit: Steve Parsons/PA Wire/Press Association Images

The Border Force is looking to recruit a technology leader to spearhead the delivery of its digital projects and the rollout of ePassport gates to more ports across the country. 

The organisation, which is part of the Home Office, is advertising a post as programme director for digital passenger services. The key responsibilities of the role include leading delivery of the Border Force’s Digital Passenger Services Programme, a key strand of which is dedicated to bringing ePassport gates and “imposter technology” to an ever-greater number of ports and airports across the UK.

The programme is also focused on “developing and growing digital services for passengers travelling between the UK and partner countries, building customer-friendly and robust digital platforms that have high customer satisfaction, extending the services to approved travellers, and marketing the services to encourage high usage”.


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The successful candidate will be expected to head up this programme, including “managing the introduction of new and expanded automated and digitised services to frontline operations”.  They will also be tasked with helping set the agenda for the development of future services and the technology that will be required to power them.

Border Force said: “The Digital Passenger Services Programme is a leading-edge programme that is automating routine border transactions, and developing and implementing schemes that reinforce border security, improving the border experience for travellers, and is driving efficiencies and generating income for Border Force.”

It added: “Set in the context of the Home Office and Border Force transformation agendas, the programme is enabling Border Force to meet elements of the departmental Spending Review commitments and crucially supporting the creation of a more tailored and modernised approach to border security.”

The successful applicant will be employed on a contract of at least two years in length, with an annual salary of between £72,000 and £87,000. The job will be based at Border Force’s offices in Croydon, although frequent travel within the UK and to Paris and Brussels will be required.

Applications are open until 11 April. 

 

About the author

Sam Trendall is editor of PublicTechnology

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